Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

who can give a definition of neutralizing antibody?

neutralizing antibody definition

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 gyma

gyma

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 07 August 2012 - 05:47 PM

Hello everyone, I have a general question. What is the definition of a neutralizing antibody? When I was going to block a surface protein's function, I was asked by my boss to use a neutralizing antibody. My understanding is that whether it is neutralizing or not depends on its effect or the result, so it is impossible to say it is a neutralizing antibody for my experiment. And I also looked for it but with no luck. None of the antibody from various companies was described as neutralizing antibody. However, I found some published papers made such description like "so we used the neutralizing antibody to XXX to block its function" while the same antibody wasnt described neutralizing on the company's website. How could they claim like that? What exactly is a neutralizing antibody? How can I use this term correctly?

#2 leelee

leelee

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 652 posts
53
Excellent

Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:16 PM

Neutralising antibody is a term typically used to describe an antibody that neutralises the effect or infectious titre of an infectious agent in the host.
In my opinion, it should only be used when discussing infectious agent.

In your case I would use the term "blocking antibody".

#3 gyma

gyma

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:29 AM

Neutralising antibody is a term typically used to describe an antibody that neutralises the effect or infectious titre of an infectious agent in the host.
In my opinion, it should only be used when discussing infectious agent.

In your case I would use the term "blocking antibody".

thanks for your reply. however, I am still wondering why there are so many people refer to their antibody as neutralizing antibody in their papers while there is nothing concerning infectious agent.

#4 leelee

leelee

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 652 posts
53
Excellent

Posted 09 August 2012 - 05:25 AM

Because its not technically incorrect to do so. Perhaps they prefer the term, or perhaps others in their field use the term routinely.

Blocking and neutralising are often used as interchangeable terms. The difference between the two is subtle, and it really is a matter of personal preference and convention I suppose.

It is my opinion that scientists should use the most correct term for what they are trying to describe. Which is why I think you should say "blocking" for your work.

You could waste a great deal of time worrying about the correctness of the terms used in papers. Scientists have a terrible habit of misusing words, or even creating new ones- especially true of those for whom English is a second language (I think writing your work up in your second language is an impressive skill, one I could never hope to master, so please don't take that as a criticism of non-English speakers!!).

As long as your are clear, accurate and understandable in your writing, it doesn't really matter :)

#5 gyma

gyma

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 09 August 2012 - 10:08 PM

thank you very much.





Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.