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freeze dried powder

powdered mushroom freeze-dried

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7 replies to this topic

#1 Sid

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:44 AM

Dear all,

I was wondering, if i were to isolate enzyme from a freeze-dried mushroom in powder form, will the enzyme that i'm looking for be inactive due to the freeze-drying applied on the mushroom?

if the enzyme is inactive, how could i activate it back? by growing the mushroom back on broth? or is there any other way?

Thank you.

#2 mdfenko

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 11:50 AM

some proteins should be fine, some will be irreversibly denatured.
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#3 Sid

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 07:03 PM

thank you for you reply,

I am trying to isolate fibrinolytic enzyme from this mushroom, but the thing is, this mushroom comes in a freeze dried powder form, which left me thinking whether the enzyme should be active or not.

some of the journals I've read used freeze-dried to purify the enzyme but it was done in a much cooler environment <4 degrees

#4 Inmost sun

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 02:29 AM

it seems to be a protease which are by trend more robust than other enzymes; you should have an in vitro standard enzyme assay for your enzyme to monitor yield and recovery after each purification step...

#5 mdfenko

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 11:30 AM

some of the journals I've read used freeze-dried to purify the enzyme but it was done in a much cooler environment <4 degrees

handling at lower temperatures (working in a cold room or keeping the sample on ice) slows down degradation of the protein.

Edited by mdfenko, 15 May 2012 - 11:30 AM.

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#6 hobglobin

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 11:44 AM

Though not an expert with proteins, freeze-drying is usually a quite mild method to conserve samples. So if the samples where first frozen promptly e.g. by immersing them in liquid nitrogen and then freeze dried (also at temperatures below -20°C), then samples are dry and usually quite stable if stored properly (not wet and/or warm). Proteins also should be okay (more or less), especially if the "cold chain" wasn't interrupted. This I also would keep when working with them, as mentioned before.

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#7 Sid

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 06:18 PM

Thank you all for your replies,

yes with low temperature then maybe i could savage something but then again i need to check back with the supplier of this mushroom whether the process of their freeze dried are done at low temperature

#8 mdfenko

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Posted 16 May 2012 - 06:59 AM

by definition, freeze drying is performed at low temperature.
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