Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

Getting rid of percipitate in Ringer solution?

Percipitate Solute Ringer Solution

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Mobley

Mobley

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 03 February 2012 - 02:17 PM

I am trying to make a Ringer solution. I followed the ingredient list from an article perfectly and had a co-worker double check my calculations. I adjusted the pH as needed with HCl. The chemicals dissolved completely and the solution looked homogenous. Then after autoclaving and sitting for a day, I'm starting to notice a pretty significant percipitate. Any ideas?

#2 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,726 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 03 February 2012 - 09:17 PM

Did you use MilliQ water? If not, you may have calcium in the water which will sometimes form a precipitate with phosphates.

#3 Mobley

Mobley

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:08 PM

I did actually.

#4 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,726 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:56 PM

Which of the many Ringer's solution recipies are you following?

#5 Mobley

Mobley

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 07 February 2012 - 11:08 AM

It is specifically for an Insect Ringer. It was published in the Journal of Insect Physiology in 2011 by Laughton et. al. The solution contains 128mM NaCl, 18mM CaCl2, 1.3mM KCl, and 2.3mM NaHCO3 in 1L dH2O. I have emailed the authors and they said their solution never has any percipitate complications unless the sodium bicarbonate becomes too old, but all of our chemical were just ordered from Sigma.

#6 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,726 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:44 PM

That should be fine, I can't see any reason why it would precipitate at all.

I make that (per litre): 7.48 g NaCl, 2 g CaCl2.2H2O, 0.097 g KCl and 0.19 g NaHCO3, just to check that you havn't made the solution extra concentrated somehow.

#7 Mobley

Mobley

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 13 February 2012 - 11:08 AM

That's exactly what I got as well. I have done this three seperate times not and each time I get a significant amount of percipitate. I'm not really sure what to try next, but thank you for your help anyways. I may try filtering and then testing the pH again to see if I'm significantly off. Otherwise, I supposed it could be an issue with the chemicals, but that is extremely unlikely.

#8 newbie99

newbie99

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 16 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 14 February 2012 - 07:04 AM

Could it be precipitation of calcium carbonate?

Add your chemicals in this order:
1- NaCl
2- KCl
Mix those two first. After they're completely dissolved, add
3- CaCl2-H2O
After it dissolves completely, finally add
4- NaHCO3

Edited by newbie99, 14 February 2012 - 07:05 AM.


#9 mdfenko

mdfenko

    an elder

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,784 posts
132
Excellent

Posted 14 February 2012 - 08:18 AM

it could be that your glassware is contaminated with detergent and you are seeing calcium phosphate precipitate.
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.