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"By using", redundant words?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Biog

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 06:18 AM

Hi,

I feel a little bit wrong when read or write "by using"!
"By" and "using" both point to the same meaning, so why some people use both words in the same clause?
Why not using only "by..." or "using" alone.... ?

Thanks

Edited by Biog, 18 January 2012 - 06:19 AM.

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#2 bioforum

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 08:41 AM

When you say "using ...", there is no need to add a "by" in front of it. This kind of redundance is very common in literature.

#3 bob1

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 01:59 PM

You might find that the "by using" is used a bit more frequently where there is an extended clause describing more than one step. For example (made up on the spot, not a real scenario, so ignore the science) "...we performed the reaction by using 50 mm acetic acid as a wash and precipitating the resulting crystals..." where the by is referring to the action and the using is referring to the solution.

#4 Biog

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 09:57 AM

Thank you for your answers.
@bob, what about: "..we performed the reaction using 50 mm acetic acid as ..." , does the meaning changes (without by)?

Edited by Biog, 19 January 2012 - 09:57 AM.

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#5 bob1

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 03:21 PM

The meaning doesn't change, but colloquialisms rarely make sense.




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