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Three questions about skeletal muscle tissue


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#1 Nephrite

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 01:51 AM

Dear all,

I tried to find answer of the questions I have in textbooks and review-papers, but I could not.

My questions are:

1. I know that the basal lamina is the internal compound of basement membrane - Sanes J.R., J Biol Chem, 2003, 278(15): 12601-12604. What is the origin of the basal lamina - the surrounding interstitial connective tissue (which should be the endomysium in my understanding) or the skeletal muscle fiber?

2. This one is probably stupid, but - do the vascular and lymphatic vessels open into the space between Basal lamina and the sarcolemma, i.e. Lamina lucida? I think they should not, but I am not sure and need someone to confirm.

3. Can satellite cells be recognized using light microscope? I think I see some smaller nuclei that differ to the skeletal muscle nuclei, but I am not a morphologist at all, so that could be a product of my imagination.

Thank you,

Nephrite

#2 LyleBabcock

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 09:10 AM

Dear all,

I tried to find answer of the questions I have in textbooks and review-papers, but I could not.

My questions are:

1. I know that the basal lamina is the internal compound of basement membrane - Sanes J.R., J Biol Chem, 2003, 278(15): 12601-12604. What is the origin of the basal lamina - the surrounding interstitial connective tissue (which should be the endomysium in my understanding) or the skeletal muscle fiber?

2. This one is probably stupid, but - do the vascular and lymphatic vessels open into the space between Basal lamina and the sarcolemma, i.e. Lamina lucida? I think they should not, but I am not sure and need someone to confirm.

3. Can satellite cells be recognized using light microscope? I think I see some smaller nuclei that differ to the skeletal muscle nuclei, but I am not a morphologist at all, so that could be a product of my imagination.

Thank you,

Nephrite



To answer numbver 3, yes satellite cells can be recognized, especially if you are staining for DNA content, such as a DAPI stain

#3 DLY

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 07:54 AM


Dear all,

I tried to find answer of the questions I have in textbooks and review-papers, but I could not.

My questions are:

1. I know that the basal lamina is the internal compound of basement membrane - Sanes J.R., J Biol Chem, 2003, 278(15): 12601-12604. What is the origin of the basal lamina - the surrounding interstitial connective tissue (which should be the endomysium in my understanding) or the skeletal muscle fiber?

2. This one is probably stupid, but - do the vascular and lymphatic vessels open into the space between Basal lamina and the sarcolemma, i.e. Lamina lucida? I think they should not, but I am not sure and need someone to confirm.

3. Can satellite cells be recognized using light microscope? I think I see some smaller nuclei that differ to the skeletal muscle nuclei, but I am not a morphologist at all, so that could be a product of my imagination.

Thank you,

Nephrite



To answer numbver 3, yes satellite cells can be recognized, especially if you are staining for DNA content, such as a DAPI stain

Just gonna answer number 3. Yes, you can see it but maybe you wanna stain for like Pax7 or something...




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