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Understanding graphs: where to start?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 BioLab

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 05:40 PM

Hello,

I find it difficult to interpret graphs from scientific papers.
I don't know what stars above bars means? Why the author chosen to connect two columns with an above horizontal bar? What does it mean p=0.005? and I don't know where to start? Can you please suggest a reading?

Many thanks.

Edited by BioLab, 24 April 2011 - 05:43 PM.


#2 newborn

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 09:33 PM

You can load that image here for better explanation. Stars and horizontal bars coulb be statistical comparision between groups. p< 0.05 means a different significance bewtween 2 groups.

#3 K.B.

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 03:34 AM

It seem you haven't got your statistics course yet. I would advise you to get one ASAP or at least read some books eg. this one.

#4 josse

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:18 AM

It seem you haven't got your statistics course yet. I would advise you to get one ASAP or at least read some books eg. this one.


Do you know that book well? Does it contain much easy to understand and realistic examples?

I need a good, easy to understand, book on statistics but dont really know any good titles.

#5 BioLab

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 12:18 PM

Thank you for your reply and suggestions.
I took a look at the book suggested, however it does not include any figure which explains how to create and understand scientific graphs.
I also agree on the need to take a statistics course, but for the time being and as I am currently reading few papers urgently, I need some references or reading explaining this particular point "How to interpret the different symbols used in scientific figures?" Of coure, every other suggestions for later, when I have more time, to strengthen my statistics background is thankful.

Thank you again.

#6 K.B.

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 02:04 PM

Do you know that book well? Does it contain much easy to understand and realistic examples?

I need a good, easy to understand, book on statistics but dont really know any good titles.


No, but it is one of the very few with promising title.

Thank you for your reply and suggestions.
I took a look at the book suggested, however it does not include any figure which explains how to create and understand scientific graphs.
I also agree on the need to take a statistics course, but for the time being and as I am currently reading few papers urgently, I need some references or reading explaining this particular point "How to interpret the different symbols used in scientific figures?" Of coure, every other suggestions for later, when I have more time, to strengthen my statistics background is thankful.


The problem is that without any background in statistics basic explanation won't actually explain anything to you.

#7 lab rat

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 07:17 PM

Which papers are you reading? Maybe we can give you a hand if we know the context.
42..."An immutable fixed-precision number of unlimited magnitude." <a href="http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)</a>, accessed 25June2009.

#8 josse

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 02:47 AM


Do you know that book well? Does it contain much easy to understand and realistic examples?

I need a good, easy to understand, book on statistics but dont really know any good titles.


No, but it is one of the very few with promising title.


WHat does this mean?

You find the title good? But that hardly says anything about the book itself?

It seems that good books on statistics are hard to find and especially books written so that people with no oor a bit of previous knowledge on maths/statistics can understand it.
Also: most of them lack many examples or if they give examples they only show the trivial basic ones...




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