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Naming system of IgG and Identification of IgG subclass


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#1 cellbio

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 08:19 PM

What is the naming system for IgG?
For example, 2F5, 3H1, 8D1....
What does the number and letter stand for?

Also, How do you identify which subclass does a IgG belongs to? IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4?

Can you identify it simply by looking at the name of the IgG? For example, Can you tell which subclass does IgG2F5 belong to based on its name?

Thank you sooooooo much!!!

#2 BioMiha

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 10:16 PM

There is no formal naming convention, so everyone can name their clones as they wish. Most of the time the names are derived from the plates and wells the clones grow from during hybridoma generation. 2F5 means plate 2 well F5. Generally this has nothing to do with the subclass of the IgGs.

Edited by BioMiha, 09 March 2011 - 10:18 PM.


#3 Chelo

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 03:48 AM

What is the naming system for IgG?
For example, 2F5, 3H1, 8D1....
What does the number and letter stand for?

Also, How do you identify which subclass does a IgG belongs to? IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4?

Can you identify it simply by looking at the name of the IgG? For example, Can you tell which subclass does IgG2F5 belong to based on its name?

Thank you sooooooo much!!!


Usually you make monoclonal antibodies by serial dilutons of policlonal hybridomas in several 96-well plates. A code like 2F5 means that you found a monoclonal hibridoma (by inspection under the microscope) in the F5 well of your second plate. As you see, this is not a formal code at all.

#4 cellbio

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:08 AM


What is the naming system for IgG?
For example, 2F5, 3H1, 8D1....
What does the number and letter stand for?

Also, How do you identify which subclass does a IgG belongs to? IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4?

Can you identify it simply by looking at the name of the IgG? For example, Can you tell which subclass does IgG2F5 belong to based on its name?

Thank you sooooooo much!!!


Usually you make monoclonal antibodies by serial dilutons of policlonal hybridomas in several 96-well plates. A code like 2F5 means that you found a monoclonal hibridoma (by inspection under the microscope) in the F5 well of your second plate. As you see, this is not a formal code at all.


Thank you for your information.

Then, I am wondering how do you know which IgG subclass your IgG belongs to?

Is there any test for that? or, you can only find it out by solving the structure?

Thanks!

#5 cellbio

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:10 AM

There is no formal naming convention, so everyone can name their clones as they wish. Most of the time the names are derived from the plates and wells the clones grow from during hybridoma generation. 2F5 means plate 2 well F5. Generally this has nothing to do with the subclass of the IgGs.


Thank you for your information.

Then, how do you find out which IgG subclass does your IgG belongs to?
Is there any test for that? Or, you can only find it out by solving the structure?

Thanks!!!

#6 BioMiha

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 12:45 AM

You can perform an ELISA (easiest, fastest, cheapest) or sequence the coding mRNA regions (can be done quite easily, however takes more time and resources than ELISA).




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