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inhibitor target a pathway


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3 replies to this topic

#1 yi198720022004

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 07:18 AM

Hi,

That's say if I found an inhibitor to a pathway. Among many points in the pathway, how can I find out that which point the inhibitor targets. Can I perform a gel shift assay?

#2 bob1

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 12:58 PM

What sort of inhibition? DNA? RNA? protein? each has their own method of detecting interaction.

#3 yi198720022004

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 08:11 PM

What sort of inhibition? DNA? RNA? protein? each has their own method of detecting interaction.


It's like a signaling transduction pathway.

Edited by yi198720022004, 22 December 2010 - 08:11 PM.


#4 dpo

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 12:00 AM

You can try to rescue the effect you get from the inhibitor. For instance, suppose you have an inhibitor acting on the Wnt signaling pathway. If overexpressed beta-catenin rescues the phenotype of the inhibitor, you know the inhibitor is acting upstream of the activation of b-ctn, for instance at the binding of the Wnt ligand to the receptor. A lot of pathways can be activated by different exogenous stimuli, so you'll have to read about your pathway and find some steps where you can intervene ...




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