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How much does a microarray experiment cost?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 seanspotatobusiness

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 11:46 AM

This is a pretty nooby question, but how much does a typical microarray experiment cost, supposing you wanted to assess differences in gene expression between two/three/four samples? Are there cheaper versions which assses fewer genes (e.g. genes known or suspected to be involved in muscle growth, maintenance, differentiation etc)?

I used to think it was about €12000 but maybe prices have come down since then or maybe I was just mistaken? I'm not planning a microarray but it would be useful to know how accessible the technology is.

#2 seanspotatobusiness

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Posted 02 November 2010 - 12:41 PM

No replies? Is that because it's a stupid question? Or there are too many factors to go into?

#3 BioBM

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Posted 02 November 2010 - 02:03 PM

There are a lot of variables that can effect the cost of the a microarray service (technology and / or method used, genome size, how many replicate runs you want, etc, etc, etc...), but just to give a very rough and general range I would say from $2000 to $30000 (in the US, that is). I'm not sure if the cost in the E.U. would be as simple as a dollar to euro conversion, but I would assume it wouldn't be too far off since access should be somewhat global seeing as how you can fedex your samples just about anywhere.
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#4 seanspotatobusiness

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 09:51 AM

Thanks, BioBM!

#5 96well

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 10:05 AM

If you want to assess fewer genes (i.e. pathway oriented) I will rather check current qPCR machines performing 1536 reactions in <0.5 uL each.
Nature magazine. Do you qualify for a free subscription?

#6 seanspotatobusiness

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 11:54 AM

If you want to assess fewer genes (i.e. pathway oriented) I will rather check current qPCR machines performing 1536 reactions in <0.5 uL each.


Yeah, I think so too :/

1536-well plates? That's a lot of pipeting!




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