Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

Find universal primers in vector


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 ram

ram

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 96 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 01 October 2010 - 01:40 AM

I have a vector sequence and I want to search which universal primers can be used with this vector. Is there any online tool available for cheeking this?
Thanaks
Ram
If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some then not ask and stay stupid.

#2 Adrian K

Adrian K

    Legendary Graduate Beggar

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 708 posts
28
Excellent

Posted 02 October 2010 - 04:05 AM

what are you trying to do with the vector? are you try to sequence it?
usually T7 promoter or M13 is the common one... not sure if there is such a checking tool available.
Expecting the world to treat you fairly because you are a good person is like expecting the lion not to attack you because you are a vegetarian.

..."best of our knowledge, as far as we know this had never been reported before, though I can't possible read all the published journals on earth, but by perform thorough search in google, the keywords did not match any documents"...

"what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger"---Goddess Casandra reminds me to be strong

"It's all just DNA. Do it."---phage434

#3 ram

ram

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 96 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 02 October 2010 - 08:24 AM

what are you trying to do with the vector? are you try to sequence it?
usually T7 promoter or M13 is the common one... not sure if there is such a checking tool available.


No I already have a sequence, but I am not sure which universal primers can be used for checking the presence of this plasmid in cells and size of the insert. I was just searching for a program which after feeding the sequence will tell me which universal primer site dies the sequence has (although this can be searched manually)
If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some then not ask and stay stupid.

#4 Adrian K

Adrian K

    Legendary Graduate Beggar

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 708 posts
28
Excellent

Posted 02 October 2010 - 09:45 AM

I thought when you purchase your vector, there is mentioned somewhere in the brochure about the sequencing primers for that particular vector? Just PCR the both forward and reverse primers together will do? Or did I just misunderstood you?
Expecting the world to treat you fairly because you are a good person is like expecting the lion not to attack you because you are a vegetarian.

..."best of our knowledge, as far as we know this had never been reported before, though I can't possible read all the published journals on earth, but by perform thorough search in google, the keywords did not match any documents"...

"what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger"---Goddess Casandra reminds me to be strong

"It's all just DNA. Do it."---phage434

#5 ram

ram

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 96 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 02 October 2010 - 01:56 PM

I thought when you purchase your vector, there is mentioned somewhere in the brochure about the sequencing primers for that particular vector? Just PCR the both forward and reverse primers together will do? Or did I just misunderstood you?


Thanks for reply and sorry for incomplete information.
This is a old construct brought from somewhere else. I did not get much information about the universal primer regions in it. I just have the sequence. And I don't want to design new primers based on the sequence but I wish that out of the several universal primers that I have, few should have a complementary region in this construct!
The original question remains at the same place! :ph34r:
"Is any online program available to find universal primer regions in a given sequence?"
If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some then not ask and stay stupid.

#6 Adrian K

Adrian K

    Legendary Graduate Beggar

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 708 posts
28
Excellent

Posted 02 October 2010 - 11:05 PM

you got the sequence, you got some primers, you can always try to search the binding site by using a word processor and your pair of good eyes.

Edited by adrian kohsf, 02 October 2010 - 11:33 PM.

Expecting the world to treat you fairly because you are a good person is like expecting the lion not to attack you because you are a vegetarian.

..."best of our knowledge, as far as we know this had never been reported before, though I can't possible read all the published journals on earth, but by perform thorough search in google, the keywords did not match any documents"...

"what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger"---Goddess Casandra reminds me to be strong

"It's all just DNA. Do it."---phage434

#7 ram

ram

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 96 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 03 October 2010 - 05:10 AM

you got the sequence, you got some primers, you can always try to search the binding site by using a word processor and your pair of good eyes.


Thanks for your reply.
Yah, definitely! As I wrote in one of my previous replies I can manually search the primer sequence in the construct. I had two intentions for asking the question: (1) to find out which universal primer regions does the construct have, irrespective of me having the primers (2) with the thought that if such program is available online, it might be helpful for me as well as for others reading Bioforum, I dropped the question which is still fundamentally unanswered.
If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some then not ask and stay stupid.




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.