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Left DNA plasmid out for a week


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#1 NinerFan49

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 04:06 PM

Hi everyone, I'm new here. I was careless and left my whole sample of plasmid DNA out for a week. I want do a pcr; will it be ok to use the plasmd?

#2 Trof

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 04:35 AM

If by "out" you mean on room temperature, then I can tell you I once forgot plasmids whole month in the corner of the bench. They were send dryed on the whatman paper over the ocean and successfuly transfected into bacteria.

I think plasmids survive a lots of things if they are in the right buffer.

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#3 NinerFan49

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 06:19 AM

If by "out" you mean on room temperature, then I can tell you I once forgot plasmids whole month in the corner of the bench. They were send dryed on the whatman paper over the ocean and successfuly transfected into bacteria.

I think plasmids survive a lots of things if they are in the right buffer.


Thanks for your input.

Yes, I mean at room temperature. That's a relief, they are in tris buffer, which should be good then.

#4 HomeBrew

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 06:55 PM

DNA's natural state is quite a bit warmer than room temperature (in mammals, anyway). Also, DNA survives quite well after repeated and prolonged exposure to high temperatures in a PCR reaction. It's all about how clean your DNA is (no nucleases) and what it's stored in (some buffer rather than water).




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