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The Use of Formamide in Sequence Analysis


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#1 PandaCreamPuff

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 05:24 AM

Hi all

I would like to know if formamide is preferably used during sequence analysis. If so why is this the case?

Thanks :-D

#2 mdfenko

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 06:08 AM

formamide is preferred (mandatory) when using beckman-coulter sequencers.
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#3 PandaCreamPuff

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 08:04 AM

ah. We have an AB 3130 Analyser and, based on convention of our lab, we use formamide as well :wacko:

Just wondering if there is any biochemical basis supporting its use in optimising sequencing results.

#4 mdfenko

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 11:17 AM

the wellred dyes used by beckman-coulter decompose at low pH (<6). water will absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide and the pH will drop. formamide, as long as it is deionized and doesn't decompose (keep water out of it, avoid freeze-thaw cycles), will not acidify as water will so the dyes will be more stable.
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do

#5 PandaCreamPuff

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 12:32 AM

ah thanks. :)




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