Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

WHAT is cRNA?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 kedar

kedar

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 38 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 25 April 2010 - 04:12 AM

As the title says, what is cRNA? why is it used? need a good clear info , papers appreciated.

specific question-
1. does cRNA injection in cells lead to protein translation or production?


thanks
Kedar

#2 pDNA

pDNA

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 493 posts
14
Good

Posted 25 April 2010 - 06:50 AM

cRNA = complementary RNA

Synthetic transcripts of a specific DNA molecule or fragment, made by an in vitro transcription system. This cRNA can be labeled with radioactive uracil and then used as a probe. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)

That's all i found ...google will help you get along!

In general it is possible to transfect cells with in-vitro transcribed RNA and produce proteins (works fine as far as i know).

Regards,
p

#3 kedar

kedar

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 38 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 25 April 2010 - 06:57 AM

cRNA = complementary RNA

Synthetic transcripts of a specific DNA molecule or fragment, made by an in vitro transcription system. This cRNA can be labeled with radioactive uracil and then used as a probe. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)

That's all i found ...google will help you get along!

In general it is possible to transfect cells with in-vitro transcribed RNA and produce proteins (works fine as far as i know).

Regards,
p


hi, thanks for the reply. This cRNA can be labeled with radioactive uracil and then used as a probe.------- can't the cDNA be labeled with and then used as probe. What is it about cRNA that is unique so it must be used.

anybodys knows it, spill it. :D

#4 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,669 posts
396
Excellent

Posted 25 April 2010 - 04:11 PM

RNA:RNA (ds RNA) is more stable than RNA:DNA hybrids, so RNA:RNA works better for in situ hybridisation, northern blots etc. In theory at least.

#5 tea-test

tea-test

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 169 posts
18
Good

Posted 26 April 2010 - 11:48 PM

hi,


as already mentioned cRNA is in vitro transcribed RNA from cDNA. you can also add a 5'cap and a poly A tail to produce "synthetic" mRNA. this cRNA can be, for instance, microinjected into X. laevis oocytes which is a common system to study membrane transport mechanisms.
I think the advantage is that you don't have to rely on the transcritpitional machinery of your host system (and it should be faster too because you are skipping the RNA transcription step) and yes the cRNA should be translated into protein.
tea-test: The artist formerly known as Ned Land




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.