Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

synchronized cells or non-synchronized cells


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 sus12

sus12

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 28 March 2010 - 09:52 AM

Hi everybody!

I want to analyze cell cycle of oxidized cells. I wonder if I have to syncronize my cells or not.
When do you syncronize the cells? I read several articles that used syncronized cells and others used non-synchronized cells, but I do know why. When do you have to use non-syncronized and when do you have to use synchronized cells?


Thank you

#2 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,737 posts
400
Excellent

Posted 28 March 2010 - 04:04 PM

You can use fluorescence activate cell sorting to look at the proportions of cells in different stages of the cell cycle in ordinary culture. However, if you want to examine a particular protein you will need to synchronise so that the signal isn't confused by cells that are not at the same stage in the cell cycle.

#3 labrat612

labrat612

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 87 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 01 April 2010 - 10:44 AM

You can use fluorescence activate cell sorting to look at the proportions of cells in different stages of the cell cycle in ordinary culture. However, if you want to examine a particular protein you will need to synchronise so that the signal isn't confused by cells that are not at the same stage in the cell cycle.



Bob is totally correct. You can use something like nocodazole to synchronize the cells to G2/M phase and then treat your cells.

#4 squallweathered

squallweathered

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 07 April 2010 - 03:06 AM

Which cells are you using?

Some cells are very easy to sync using some methods, while other cell lines will ignore the method. As standard, we usually use double thymidine blocking in our work, but for one or two lines we've needed to resort to elutriation as no chemicals would sync the cells sufficiently.

As mentioned, if there would be background signals from across the cell cycle for your particular end point then you may need to sync.




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.