Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

How to ask the author for an E. coli strains used in his paper?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 fzhang

fzhang

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 14 January 2010 - 08:54 AM

hi, all. Recently I read an article about a temperature sensitive E. coli strain. This strain was constructed and screened in the author's lab, and I want to see if my gene could rescue the temperature sensitive phenotype of the strain. Can I just email the author and ask for it? Is it too rude? And if there is some other procedures I can follow, please let me know.Thx.

#2 pito

pito

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,338 posts
82
Excellent

Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:10 AM

You can always ask.. there is no other way to get it, if they (the authors) created this strain.
If you ask gently, they might help you.

If its in the interest of your research, you can email the authors with the reasons why you want to research their strain and explain them what you are doing etc...

There are 3 responses then:
- None
- an answer telling you they will not or can not help you
- an answer that they indeed can help you

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#3 Vini

Vini

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 178 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:36 AM

yeah........theres nothing rude in requesting.........in fact, some of them are actually nice and do help....my labmate had sent such a request once, to a scientist and he promptly sent her the clone she required......just frame a properly worded letter..........and hope for the best... :(

#4 gfischer

gfischer

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 195 posts
9
Neutral

Posted 14 January 2010 - 10:11 AM

Also, don't be afraid to kiss a little a$$ in your initial contact. Nothing too over-the-top, but phrases like:
Dear ___________, I read with great interest your paper...

A little flattery can't hurt your cause.
Above all things, if kindness is your king,
then heaven will be yours, before you meet your end

#5 pDNA

pDNA

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 493 posts
14
Good

Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:16 PM

in certain journals the authors are engaged to make their strains/plasmids/whatever publicly available upon request!

Regards,
p

#6 fzhang

fzhang

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 14 January 2010 - 05:26 PM

ok, thanks a lot! I will try!

#7 molgen

molgen

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 167 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 19 January 2010 - 01:29 AM

The e-mail of the one of the authors is listed in the article for just such cases.




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.