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precise definition of exon?


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#1 smoo

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 03:20 AM

I have seen conflicting definitions for the term "exon".

I have a gene that codes for a single functional protein, where the coding region is split into two parts by a group I intron. Do these two parts comprise a single exon, or two exons? Some definitions of exon state that the term applies to the "mature" form of the RNA (i.e. after intron splicing) while others imply that it refers to the immature form (or to the DNA) and thus that two parts of a coding region separated by an intron are two separate exons.

Sorry if this is not the best forum for this, but I need a quick answer..

#2 Vini

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 03:29 AM

I have seen conflicting definitions for the term "exon".

I have a gene that codes for a single functional protein, where the coding region is split into two parts by a group I intron. Do these two parts comprise a single exon, or two exons? Some definitions of exon state that the term applies to the "mature" form of the RNA (i.e. after intron splicing) while others imply that it refers to the immature form (or to the DNA) and thus that two parts of a coding region separated by an intron are two separate exons.

Sorry if this is not the best forum for this, but I need a quick answer..



Hi, in ur case, these will be referred to as two different exons.

#3 bob1

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 03:59 PM

The Oxford English Dictionary defines exon as:

"A section of a DNA or RNA molecule that codes for a protein, in cases where such sections are separated by non-coding ones"

You have 2 exons in your gene.

#4 smoo

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 04:21 PM

Thanks both!




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