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Good Mystery books


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Maddie

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 12:13 PM

Hi everyone,

I am a readerholic. Always looking for a new author. I like mystery books, they relax me after a day of work and I would like to find one where the author talks about Science and actually KNOWS what he is talking about. See, what I mean? None of that CSI crap: no PCR doesn't happen in 5 mn.

So if you have something to recommend, please let me know. And don't be shy, I'll borrow it a the library and won't waste money anyway :lol:
Theory is when we know everything and nothing is working. Practice is when everything is working and nobody knows why. Here, we combine theory and practice. Nothing is working and nobody knows why.

A. Einstein

#2 Prep!

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 01:39 AM

Hi maddie
I never read novels.. i actually hate it but i ve heard that robin cook writes good medical suspence novels... might interest u!! :lol:
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#3 gogreen

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 08:36 AM

PI, Robin Cook is actually a great writer..I've read most of his novels..But one of them named Abduction is the only one which I started reading and didnt find it interesting, but this is not the regular Robin Cook medical thriller..I bought this book, read it half way and stopped...I'm currently using it as a platform for my laptop :)

Edited by gogreen, 27 November 2009 - 11:44 AM.


#4 gogreen

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 10:22 AM

Hi Maddie, Thr is a book named weird science if you like to read the mystery stuff..I forgot the name of the author, but was interesting stuff..Tried googling it, no luck


Found it at last

http://www.google.co...b...&sa=title#p

Edited by gogreen, 27 November 2009 - 10:42 AM.


#5 Maddie

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 08:35 AM

A tile with Science and UFO in the same sentence? ;)
Thanks gogreen, I will jump and take the risk..then I'll come back with a review.. B)
Theory is when we know everything and nothing is working. Practice is when everything is working and nobody knows why. Here, we combine theory and practice. Nothing is working and nobody knows why.

A. Einstein

#6 hobglobin

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 08:42 AM

If you want more of sound science but less mystery (if at all), then Carl Djerassi might be good. Science-in-fiction is the genre called in wikipedia, Cantors Dilemma, NO, The Bourbaki Gambit, etc.

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#7 smu

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 08:46 AM

Not really mystery, but my favorite science fiction book by far is War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells.

#8 hobglobin

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 10:57 AM

Here's a short list, I just got, actually I only read one of it some time ago but didn't liked it (I'm not a Crichton fan anyway). Therefore I cannot guarantee for scientific quality (and writing skills):

  • Jean-Christophe Rufin: Le Parfum d'Adam (microbiology)
  • Michael Crichton: State of Fear (ecology)
  • Martin Suter: Small World (neurology)
  • Catherine Gildiner: Seduction (psychology)
  • Kathy Reichs: Grave Secrets (forensic); several other titles too
  • Adam Fawer: Improbable (mathematics)
  • Ken Follett: The Third Twin (genetics)
  • Douglas Preston / Lincoln Child: The Cabinet of Curiosities (chemistry)

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#9 aimikins

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 01:20 PM

hmmm...I have found Robin Cook to have poor science and thin plots, but that's just my opinion.

I like Patricia Cornwell. I'm no pathologist, but there don't seem to be a lot of glaring inconsistencies in the science.

and I know what you mean! Agent Scully is forever my hero; she can do a Southern Blot in about 2 hours....
"it is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education" -A.E.

#10 LostintheLab

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 06:32 PM

Not really mystery, but my favorite science fiction book by far is War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells.


I've never read the book, but love the film and radio adaptions.
I really like "Day of Triffids" by John Wyndham

Written in the early 1950's, but it gets a grip on genetic technology before that was really understood.
I knew it! I knew it! Well, not in the sense of having the slightest idea, but I knew there was something I didn't know.

#11 casandra

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 06:44 PM

I've read most of K Reichs' books...bones and dead everything.....the science- forensics (anthropological) mainly is quite precise, I think, to the point of making me yawn but they're definitely worth reading and shld interest Maddie....and Reichs adds that distinctive Quebec flavour which gives more culture and therefore depth to some of the books in the series...

and perhaps as a parallel, I've also read most except the latest one of Patricia Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta series...another forensic specialist. The strength of this series is mostly in the character development (or degeneration) and more convoluted plots...and IMO, unlike Reichs' more clinical style, Cornwell's writing is highly evocative, dark and she draws you into her world of crime and violence --and then after you almost fall off the edge of your seat and your blood gets flooded with stress hormones, she'd then bring you back to the safety of her kitchen where you can watch her prepare pasta from scratch...:P...I guess Cornwell's writing is as good as her cooking...

Edited by casandra, 09 December 2009 - 07:38 PM.

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- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#12 gogreen

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 12:23 AM

Never read anything by Patricia Conwell...but if her she has a dual degree in cooking and writing, I think I should give it a try :lol: Thanks Casey !

Edited by gogreen, 10 December 2009 - 12:23 AM.


#13 casandra

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 06:34 AM

Never read anything by Patricia Conwell...but if her she has a dual degree in cooking and writing, I think I should give it a try :lol: Thanks Casey !

You’re welcome, googoo doc. :lol: But I have to warn you that I started reading them when I was in high school…I read practical everything back then (my Dad called me an industrial vacuum cleaner :D) so please don’t hate me if you hate her books after……or better yet- get her cookbooks first to get you in the mood- Food To die For and Winter Table…

And you shld definitely start off with the first one – Post Mortem, which lays all the groundwork …her books are good considering its genre i.e. crime, mystery, suspense etc. not exactly Ulysses or The Grapes of Wrath but enough to keep you entertained. I actually prefer PD James and Anne Perry's Monk series, still light reading altho unfortunately, not a lot of science there. Happy reading and happy cooking ....and please don't burn the water...:lol:...
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#14 hobglobin

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 12:31 PM

And don't forget Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories. I like all the novels and they are scientifically sound, but from a 19th century view and its knowledge... :D

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#15 Maddie

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 03:12 PM

Oh man, I missed a lot.
I followed your advise, Pradeep. I am in the middle of Robin Cook "Marker" and so far it's pretty great. I'm looking forward going on which is a good sign.

As for Cornwell, Reich and co...well...I already read them all. Hey I'm the forensic girl, this is business.

Hobglobin, thanks, I will look closely at your list. I LOVE Douglas Preston / Lincoln Child: The Cabinet of Curiosities.
Did I say I love it? Well actually I really love this book. I read all the Preston & Child as well as some Preston (only) or Child (only) and this one is still my favorite.

For the forensic fans, you can try Jefferson & Baas. Baas is the professor who created the Body Farm in TN. His books are very entertaining. The hero is a professor from the body farm so ,as you can imagine, you learn some stuff. For example I found out in his latest book that some people float and some sink !!??? I wonder if it's true and if it is, why (unless all the sinker are above 200 pounds). B)
You also learn that when you burn, your arm muscles retract, so if you find a burnt body and the arm are straight, you should wonder if you don't have a homicide.
Theory is when we know everything and nothing is working. Practice is when everything is working and nobody knows why. Here, we combine theory and practice. Nothing is working and nobody knows why.

A. Einstein




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