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Enveloped Viruses


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#1 Mr Jefferson

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 07:01 AM

Does anyone know whether it is possible for an enveloped virus that has been stripped of its envelope (ie a nude virus particle) to achieve infection of a cell?

All theories (based either in fact or fiction) are welcome.

#2 bob1

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 11:59 AM

You mean just DNA or RNA strands or do you mean one of the viruses that use a lipid based layer as well as a protein coat?

I both cases I would say yes - however, the protein coat scenario is more likely to cause infection, especially if there is no immune response. DNA/RNA are commonly used to re-create viruses in vitro by transfection (usually in the form of plasmids), so there is a very slim chance that a nude DNA or RNA might cause formation of more virus particles if exactly the right conditions happen.

Edited by bob1, 26 September 2009 - 11:59 AM.


#3 Mr Jefferson

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 06:43 AM

You mean just DNA or RNA strands or do you mean one of the viruses that use a lipid based layer as well as a protein coat?

I both cases I would say yes - however, the protein coat scenario is more likely to cause infection, especially if there is no immune response. DNA/RNA are commonly used to re-create viruses in vitro by transfection (usually in the form of plasmids), so there is a very slim chance that a nude DNA or RNA might cause formation of more virus particles if exactly the right conditions happen.


Yes, I mean that the lipid bi-layer is missing yet the nucleocapsid remains intact presumably protecting the genomic mataterial. What mechanism would the virus use instead of receptor recognition provided by the 'spikes' in the envelope? Better yet can you direct me to a paper where this has been investigated?

#4 bob1

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 03:47 PM

Sorry, no refs, it was just a guess that it might be possible as non-enveloped viruses are capable of it.

#5 gfischer

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:17 AM

The only problem with this scenario is that the capsid of a normally enveloped virus would generally lack surface recognition proteins needed to gain entry into the cell, since these proteins are on the envelope.
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#6 Thomas Karmen DDS

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 11:18 AM

You mean just DNA or RNA strands or do you mean one of the viruses that use a lipid based layer as well as a protein coat?

I both cases I would say yes - however, the protein coat scenario is more likely to cause infection, especially if there is no immune response. DNA/RNA are commonly used to re-create viruses in vitro by transfection (usually in the form of plasmids), so there is a very slim chance that a nude DNA or RNA might cause formation of more virus particles if exactly the right conditions happen.



I would agree that they can both cause infection, but cellular wall destruction achieves loss of DNA and consequently it will include loss of infectious capabilities. recreation of viruses by transfection is common and as long as the DNA or RNA remain intact it can be continually infectious.




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