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ATP synthesis in Glycolysis, Electron Transport Chain, Citric Acid Cycle


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#1 fifa

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 09:25 PM

I have been struggling with a couple of sample questions we have I know that glycolysis uses ADP and P to form ATP in breaking up glucose. The citric acid cycle uses ADP and GTP to forum ATP and GDP. Also, the electron transport chain uses ADP and P to form ATP. What am I mistaking here since the question doesn't include all of these?

Substrate-level phosphorylation occurs within a metabolic pathway where sufficient energy is released by a given chemical reaction to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and phosphate. Substrate-level phosphorylation is seen in which metabolic pathway(s)?
a. glycolysis
b. electron transport chain
c. All of these pathways involve steps where substrate level phosphorylation takes place.
d. citric acid cycle
e. both glycolysis and the citric acid cycle



Also, I am having some problems with understanding some of the cellular respiration reactions. For the respiratory chain, I know the electrons are received from NADH and FADH2. Also, I think the final electron acceptor is oxygen so I think it is all of these. So would all of these be true?

Which of the following is (are) true of the respiratory chain?
a. Electrons are received from NADH and FADH2.
b. Usually the terminal electron acceptor is oxygen.
c. Most of the enzymes are part of the inner mitochondrial membrane.
d. All of these are true about the respiratory chain.
e. Electrons are passed from donor to recipient carrier molecules in a series of oxidation-reduction reactions.

Thank you for your help.

#2 Michaelro

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 11:18 PM

Hi
First of all You have a mistake.
Citric acid cycle don't use GTP to form ATP but produces GTP by substrate level phosphorylation.
GTP is equivalent to ATP according to energy content and they are interconvertable.
So, all the processes (glycolysis, Krebs cycle and electron transport chain) contain substrate-level phosphorylation reactions.
Regarding the second question, all is true.
Best
Michael





I have been struggling with a couple of sample questions we have I know that glycolysis uses ADP and P to form ATP in breaking up glucose. The citric acid cycle uses ADP and GTP to forum ATP and GDP. Also, the electron transport chain uses ADP and P to form ATP. What am I mistaking here since the question doesn't include all of these?

Substrate-level phosphorylation occurs within a metabolic pathway where sufficient energy is released by a given chemical reaction to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and phosphate. Substrate-level phosphorylation is seen in which metabolic pathway(s)?
a. glycolysis
b. electron transport chain
c. All of these pathways involve steps where substrate level phosphorylation takes place.
d. citric acid cycle
e. both glycolysis and the citric acid cycle



Also, I am having some problems with understanding some of the cellular respiration reactions. For the respiratory chain, I know the electrons are received from NADH and FADH2. Also, I think the final electron acceptor is oxygen so I think it is all of these. So would all of these be true?

Which of the following is (are) true of the respiratory chain?
a. Electrons are received from NADH and FADH2.
b. Usually the terminal electron acceptor is oxygen.
c. Most of the enzymes are part of the inner mitochondrial membrane.
d. All of these are true about the respiratory chain.
e. Electrons are passed from donor to recipient carrier molecules in a series of oxidation-reduction reactions.

Thank you for your help.






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